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    Three ways integrated design can improve a future food manufacturing facility

     

    The food safety quality of your next facility depends on whether the people designing and constructing your plant can communicate effectively.

    Working with a fully integrated design-build firm—one that provides process engineering, building and infrastructure design, and construction services with all in-house resources—can improve the long-term food safety of your facility in three specific ways.

    1. Communication is consolidated

    A food processing facility is essentially giant puzzle where a variety of specialized experts each hold the different pieces needed to assemble it. No one discipline owns the entire puzzle, so effective communication is essential. Every element that is critical to your plant’s food safety comes down to communication between these teams, which can include:

    • Process design
    • Architecture
    • Mechanical
    • Electrical
    • Refrigeration
    • Construction.

    Here’s the thing: Unless a fully integrated firm is handling the development of your plant, these different elements often get outsourced to a variety of companies – and the more companies you have involved, the greater the opportunity for miscommunication.

    The non-integrated approach

    The “old-school” approach with a non-integrated firm establishes the architect as the middleman for all communication to the construction manager. In other words, the architect would give direction to the mechanical and refrigeration contractors (likely two separate engineering firms), even though they aren’t trained in those disciplines. Obviously, this opens the door to communication breakdown.

    The integrated approach

    However, with a fully integrated firm, the mechanical and refrigeration departments are employees of the same company and are often located in the very same office. They communicate with each other directly and daily, eliminating possible confusion and streamlining the process to minimize any potential food safety risks down the road.

    2. Design and construction teams are highly coordinated

    A food plant is like a complex puzzle. Not only do certain pieces of the puzzle belong to different specialized teams, but each piece is dependent on the pieces that come before it. For example, in order to properly design the structural framing of a building, you have to know the size, weight and location of the HVAC and Refrigeration units that will be on the roof. Getting from point A to point Z of the project is a carefully coordinated dance.

    When it comes to ensuring the long-term food safety of a food plant, communication between design and construction teams is critical. In a world where the tiniest of oversights can trigger a massive recall, a food-safe design is meaningless unless it’s properly implemented by the construction team. This is where you can run into trouble with a non-integrated approach.

    The non-integrated approach

    Working with a non-integrated firm often means the field team is often receiving plans drawn up by another vendor and trying to implement them on-site. Plus, navigating the channels to contact a designer at another firm in a different city is nowhere near as efficient as calling your co-worker’s direct line back at the office

    The integrated approach

    This is a stark contrast to a fully integrated firm, where the field staff is in-tune with the design team’s work. The construction manager is on a first-name basis with the design team and has been sitting in on meetings from day one of the project – he understands why certain elements were designed a certain way and can easily call the design team with any questions.

    Piping and the risk of condensation

    In terms of food safety, one of the most common examples where design and construction synergy is needed is with piping. If the design team has a pipe running from a warm area to a cold area of the plant, there are certain factors that need to be accounted for in order to avoid condensation (of course, excess moisture can foster bacterial growth and is a huge food safety risk). Addressing condensation issues involves a number of disciplines including:

    1. Mechanical (the “designer” of the warm side of the wall and, possibly, responsible for the insulation and function of the pipe itself)
    2. Refrigeration (the “designer” of the cold side of the wall and, possibly, responsible for the insulation and function of the pipe itself)
    3. Structural (responsible for the steel joists that also pass through that same thermal condition)
    4. Architecture (responsible for the wall details through which the pipes travel as well as for the joist insulation detail—often referred to as a “doughnut”)
    5. Electrical (the possible provider of heat trace to fight against condensation).

    In this scenario, working with a fully integrated design-build firm comes with a variety of benefits:

    • The field team can quickly and directly call the architecture department to ask about discrepancies that arise (e.g. need for insulation, etc.)
    • The construction team and field staff regularly hold internal design reviews
    • All team members have a mutual respect and comfort level that makes it easy to collaborate and get answers quickly.

    Bridging the gap between design and construction is clearly critical to the food safety of a facility. Contracting a truly integrated firm helps closes that gap for good.

    3. Troubleshooting is focused on problem-solving, not finger pointing

    While some firms may say they offer the elements of an integrated firm, it often means subcontracting certain work to outside vendors that they will manage.

    The non-integrated approach

    This delicate house of cards can come crashing down should you ever encounter an issue, whether in the construction process or down the road when your facility is operational. When there’s a problem, the general contractor has to go down the line of their subcontractors to hold the responsible party accountable, navigating insurance issues and their separate, respective contracts along the way. It’s not uncommon for some subcontractors to point the finger at other vendors rather than accept responsibility for mistakes and work together to reach a resolution. Not only can this “blame game” be a cumbersome legal headache, it’s one more problem on your plate when dealing with a food safety discrepancy.

    The integrated approach

    A fully integrated firm can quickly resolve an issue no matter which department is responsible. If it’s a design miss, construction and design will work together to find the best way to overcome it. If it’s a construction issue, they take the same approach. Fully integrated firms naturally provide a checks-and-balances approach to take full ownership of the project, ensuring potential hazards don’t slip under the radar. Not to mention, such issues are less common with an integrated approach anyways, since communication barriers aren’t a factor in the first place.

    There are a number of reasons a fully integrated design-build method will ensure that the next project is a success, but if there’s one area where you can’t take chances, it’s food safety. It’s a no-brainer if you want to invest in the long-term security and safety of your product, your consumers and your company.

    -Jason Duff, VP, design engineering at Stellar. This article originally appeared on Stellar Food for ThoughtStellar is a CFE Media content partner.

    View the original article and related content on Plant Engineering

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    Offsetting the costs of patient satisfaction with operational efficiencies

    When operations run smoothly in health care facilities, everyone benefits. By employing an engineering strategy focused on increasing operational efficiency, hospitals achieve cost savings that allow them to dedicate more resources to elevating patient care and increasing patient satisfaction.

    There are several solutions that improve efficiency while saving cost and time for health care facilities.

    Airflow changes

    Occupied spaces in a health care facility require a high level of airflow changes per hour, and air handling units (AHUs) use a great deal of energy. For example, an occupied operating room requires a minimum of 20 air changes per hour for the protection of the patient. When an operating room isn’t in use, however, the air change rate may be lowered. This allows a facility to turn down the airflow rate to save on energy costs while still maintaining the positive pressure the room needs even when unoccupied.

    “Many facilities install a control panel in operating rooms that allows staff to lower the airflow rate when the operating room will be unoccupied,” said Marty Herrick, P.E., associate at RTM.” The operating rooms are then turned up to their occupied rate for the procedure-from preparation through cleanup-which ensures the safety of patients and may result in energy cost savings of one-half to one-third.”

    Occupancy sensors also can be installed as a primary or backup method to reduce airflow in vacant operating rooms.

    LED Lighting

    Implementing energy-efficient lighting results in a host of long-term benefits for the facility. Quality illumination is necessary for every space within a facility – from patient rooms and hallways to parking garages and MRI suites – but it also is a significant expense. LED lighting provides better functionality than fluorescent lighting, lasting longer and requiring less upkeep. The end result? The facility saves money and maintenance time.

    Remote Control

    An advanced building automation system allows facility staff to get equipment feedback and troubleshoot problems remotely. This ease of access allows for faster turnaround times when rectifying a problem as it relates to room environment. Staff can view data on everything from plumbing pumps and emergency generators to exhaust fans and AHUs from points throughout the hospital or even off-site locations.

    “If a patient is complaining his room is too warm, the facility staff can investigate possible causes of the problem through the automation system,” said Herrick. “Without even entering the patient’s room, they can determine if the heating valve is open or closed, and look at points from the variable air volume (VAV) box to verify it is also operating correctly.”

    This article originally appeared on RTM’s website. RTM engineering is a CFE Media content partner. Edited by Hannah Cox, content specialist, CFE Media, hcox@cfemedia.com.

    View the original article and related content on Consulting Specifying Engineer

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    Four ways agricultural drones are helping farmers’ productivity

    Drone technology, enabled by advances in imaging technology, is revolutionizing the agricultural industry. Approximately 80% of global drone industry revenues are related to agriculture. That fact may sound surprising, given all the consumer and commercial applications that come to mind when thinking of drones, but they are proving to be particularly useful in agriculture.

    Monitoring large fields of crops used to be time-consuming and inaccurate, but drones are changing that very quickly. Farmers are finding innovative ways to leverage drones with advanced imaging technology to improve their annual yields and refine their farming processes.

    4 ways agricultural drones are being used by farmers

    While drone technology equipped with advanced imaging systems is still relatively new technology, there are four main ways it is being used so far.

    1. Soil and field analysis

    Drones are instrumental at the start of the crop cycle. They can produce 3D maps for initial soil analysis, which is a major help in planning seed planting patters. Then, after planting, the same type of soil analysis can be used for irrigation data and nitrogen-level management.

    2. Crop monitoring

    In the past, satellites were the most advanced form of crop monitoring, but had significant drawbacks. Now, drone imaging technology enables time-series animations that reveal the development of a crop and any inefficiencies in production. This leads to overall better crop management by giving the farmer a holistic view of what’s happening in their fields.

    3. Irrigation

    Drones with advanced imaging systems can provide soil analysis for irrigation by showing which parts of a field are dry and which are wet. This allows a farmer to immediately address irrigation concerns, whereas before the only method was to drive around on an ATV and look for dry spots. Using drones for irrigation ultimately improves crop yields.

    4. Crop health assessment

    There are many different ways drones are used to assess crop health. Multi-spectral imaging is used to determine overall crop health based on visible and near-infrared light emissions. Drones can also be used to spot fungal or bacterial infections—the detection of which can save an entire field from disease. Even in the event of crop loss, a farmer can comb back through drone data to analyze what went wrong and adjust farming processes from there.

    While there are certainly other drone methods being deployed by farmers, such as seed planting and crop spraying, the four mentioned above are some of the most innovative combinations of drone and imaging technology being used today. Imaging and drone technology are only advancing, and as they improve so will farmers’ techniques for boosting productivity and annual yields.

    This article originally appeared on Vision Online. AIA is part of the Association for Advanced Automation (A3). A3 is a CFE Media content partner. Edited by Carly Marchal, content specialist, CFE Media, cmarchal@cfemedia.com

    View the original article and related content on Control Engineering

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    Top three advantages of LED lighting in health care

    A growing number of health care facilities are implementing light emitting diodes (LED) lighting systems within their organization as a way to foster a safe, healthy, comfortable, and green environment for patients and staff.

    Advantages of LED lighting within health care include:

    1. Optimal visibility

    The even distribution of colors provided by LED lighting result in more saturated and vivid color renderings that work together to allow optimal visibility. Due to full directional down-lighting, LED provides more illumination on working surfaces, as opposed to the diffuse glow produced by gas-filled fluorescent tubes. The color temperature, color rendering, and efficiency of LED lights combine to improve visibility, which is a major contributing factor to an individual’s level of satisfaction when receiving and responding to treatments. The higher levels of luminance delivered by LEDs ensure that details are not missed, even when lighting is dimmed.

    2. Little to no maintenance expense and minimal downtime

    In a typical hospital, lighting, heating, and hot water represent between 61 and 79 percent of total energy use depending on climate. These tend to be the best targets for energy savings. High-quality LED products can last up to 20 times longer than any other artificial light source, reducing the time, cost, and effort of maintenance. LEDs require minimal maintenance due to their longer lifecycle, disposal costs, and smaller physical size.

    3. Energy efficient and sustainable

    Hospitals that operate on tight budgets are nearly always looking for ways to save operating expenses so as to focus the budget on areas that will increase patient satisfaction. LEDs can save a healthcare facility up to 50 – 80 percent of its electricity bill, since LED lighting systems use 90 percent less energy depending on the type being installed. Known primarily for their energy efficiency, LED bulbs produce more lumens per watt, resulting in less power needed to produce more light output. LEDs are recyclable since they contain no mercury or mercury vapor-this results in zero hazardous waste and disposal expense, ensuring employees and patients aren’t exposed to any hazardous elements.

    This article originally appeared on RTM’s website. RTM engineering is a CFE Media content partner. Edited by Hannah Cox, content specialist, CFE Media, hcox@cfemedia.com.

    View the original article and related content on Consulting Specifying Engineer

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    Top three commercial lighting design trends in 2017

    With the constant advancement of technology, owners continue to see innovative lighting options flood the market. Lighting plays a huge role as commercial building owners work towards continuously improving safety for tenants, aesthetics, and function to ensure occupant comfort, while also benefiting from cost savings.

    Here are a few trends that will continue to gain traction in commercial lighting design in 2017:

    LED retrofitting

    Benefits of making the switch to LED include enhanced lighting quality, improved energy efficiency, smart lighting capabilities, and lower maintenance costs. Retrofitting LED lighting networks in commercial buildings adds flexibility and means companies can adjust light color and brightness to levels that mimic natural light and promote productivity and health; this is known as daylighting. A growing number of businesses are completing LED retrofit overhauls as the technology continues to advance, encompassing a wide range of capabilities.

    Use of natural light

    Many studies have proven the benefits of exposure to natural light for employees, including improved performance, better sleep, higher employee satisfaction, and even increased sales. More natural light seeping into an office can significantly lessen a building’s energy load, which is great for an owner’s and tenant’s bottom lines. Today’s smart LED lighting systems monitor levels of natural light and adjust their output to optimal levels. This trend will continue to gain traction in the years to come.

    Smart lighting

    Smart lighting technology advances year after year, gaining popularity because of its many benefits. Controls embedded into each fixture deliver impressive results, including dramatic savings on energy costs. A Business Insider report highlighted how a packaging company slashed energy cost by 75% and improved worked productivity by 20% at one of its plants by installing smart LED lights.

    Some commercial building owners have leveraged smart lighting control systems to meet energy efficiency codes, like that of ASHRAE, by programming the system to meet specific parameters. By measuring temperatures, room occupancy, and energy loads, the smart systems adjust by harvesting daylight or turning off in empty rooms to keep the building’s energy use within set parameters.

    Many smart lighting systems are programmed to give administrators wireless control via a mobile phone or tablet from anywhere in the world, allowing for convenient and effective access.

    This article originally appeared on RTM’s website. RTM engineering is a CFE Media content partner. Edited by Hannah Cox, content specialist, CFE Media, hcox@cfemedia.com.

    View the original article and related content on Consulting Specifying Engineer

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    Replacing an EPSS at a hospital 

    Learning objectives:

    • Demonstrate how to avoid disruption to a fully operational hospital when implementing a new emergency power supply system.
    • Understand why the location of a new EPSS matters.

    An emergency power supply system (EPSS) is an important component of health care facility operations. It is the lifeline of every hospital. Replacement of these systems while keeping the hospital fully operational can be challenging, therefore critical steps must be taken to ensure that the transition from one system to the next is flawless.

    Regardless of the size of the facility,  an EPSS is required in every health care setting for the safety and security of patients, staff, and visitors. Having this standard in place helps health care facilities avoid patient evacuation when faced with a natural disaster that has caused the electrical system to unexpectedly shut down.

    However, even with mandatory laws such as NFPA 70: National Electrical Code 517-25 requiring the implementation of an EPSS, things can go terribly wrong; as was the case for a prominent hospital in New York City during Superstorm Sandy. When the hospital’s backup generators failed or proved inadequate, the hospital was forced to evacuate nearly 1,000 patients. This is a risk that most health care facilities do not want to take.

    Generator location 

    To provide enough power to a significantly sized hospital, the engineering team, along with the hospital’s facilities management staff and project manager, need to consider the locations of the generators and the paralleling switchgear. These systems should be moved from what might be a hazardous location.

    One consideration would be to locate the emergency electrical system on the 1st floor (or higher) of a powerhouse to avoid any potential hazardous flooding concerns. In any case, the generator, switchgear, and other required equipment need to be located above the local floodplain. In areas exposed to seismic activity, systems should not be located on rooftops or in basements in case of an earthquake or other natural disasters.

    Maintaining an N+1 system 

    Due to the critical nature of emergency power in hospitals, implementing a system with the highest amount of reliability is preferred, especially as the last line of defense securing the safety of its patients, staff, and visitors. Adding a generator equal in size to the largest existing generator provides the added reliability of an N+1 system, where N equals the actual electrical emergency load of the hospital and +1 doubles that actual electrical emergency load to provide added security in case of un unexpected shutdown.

    In larger hospitals, there typically is more than one emergency generator in place. For example, consider a major health care facility in Troy, Mich. To support a major expansion at the hospital, three existing 745, 900-, and 1,200-kW emergency generators were replaced with two larger 2,000-kW generators. The decision to move to larger generators also was a result of the NFPA 110: Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems Table 4.1 code requirements or the 10-second rule that states, “The life safety and critical branches shall be installed and connected to the alternative power source so that all functions supplied by these branches specified here shall be automatically restored to operation within 10 seconds after interruption of the normal source” (NEC 517.31).

    Typically, it is not recommended to design an emergency system that relies on synchronizing two or more generators together within 10 seconds or less. Good engineering practice recommends that the emergency system design takes into consideration the capacity of one generator, which shall exceed the life safety and critical emergency loads. The other emergency loads in the hospital shall be delayed until other generators are synchronized and connected to the emergency paralleling switchgear.

    Loads requiring emergency power other than the life safety and critical branches are permitted to be delayed based on NFPA 70. 517.34 (A) (B). Once the transfer is complete, the remaining generators are connected to the new emergency system. Then the remaining loads of the essential electrical system shall be transferred to the emergency paralleling switchgear.

    Staying fully operational during transition

    In most cases, implementation of a new EPSS is designed and completed in multiple phases to avoid disruption to the existing emergency system in the hospital. Any changes to the EPSS, including the replacement or modification of the existing emergency system, will introduce the possibility of losing the alternative power.

    Therefore, most of the work would need to be scheduled around the hospital staff and administrators working schedules, therefore requiring temporary reallocation of usable spaces within the hospital. A temporary generator might be the solution to be able to keep the availability of the alternative power source while the permanent emergency generators are being replaced. Special attention to the transfer switches’ control wires shall be considered to assure the availability of emergency power when any of the automatic transfer switches call for it.

    The bottom line in any health care environment is the safety and well-being of patients, staff, and visitors. Following these and other guidelines will assist the design and construction team in creating a smooth transition between an existing and new EPSS that will make any growing health care facility better equipped for handling an unexpected loss of power.


    Sam Awabdeh is vice president at Peter Basso Associates

    View the original article and related content on Consulting Specifying Engineer

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    Lighting in government/military facilities

    The Consulting-Specifying Engineer 2017 Lighting and Lighting Controls Study indicated that 45% of engineers specify, design, or make product selections for government buildings and/or military facilities—and eight in 10 of these engineers are responsible for determining the requirements/writing specifications for these projects. Below are five lighting engineering and design findings as they relate to government/military facility projects:

    1. Revenue: The average firm earns $790,000 annually from lighting and lighting control products specified into new and existing government/military facilities, with 42% bringing in more than $1 million each year from these projects.

    2. Systems specified: The top three lights or lighting control products being specified into government/military facilities are LEDs (94%); lighting controls and/or addressable systems (78%); and any size T5, T8, or T12 (55%).

    3. Specifications: Engineers are most frequently issuing prescriptive lighting system specifications (77%) for government/military facility projects, followed by performance specifications (65%).

    4. Outlook: Eighteen percent of engineers are concerned about frequent 

      changes to codes and standards; the usage of controls, building automation, and addressable systems; and keeping up with new/changing technology for lighting design in regards to future government/military facility projects.

    5. Comparing products: Overall quality is most important when selecting a lighting product for a government/military facility; engineers are also looking at product energy efficiency, their previous experience with manufacturers, and superior service support.

    View more information at https://www.csemag.com/media-library/research/2017-lighting-lighting-controls-study.html. Amanda Pelliccione is the research director at CFE Media.

    View the original article and related content on Consulting Specifying Engineer

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    Rittal Adds IRU Cage Nut Assembly for Enclosures Saves Time, Requires No Tools

    Schaumburg, IL – July 26, 2016 – Rittal North America (www.rittalenclosures.com), the world’s largest enclosure manufacturer and a leader in thermal management of electrical, electronic and IT equipment, has added a 19” Cage Nut Fastener for enclosures to its parts offerings.

    This 1RU cage nut assembly is simple to install as an alternative to time consuming capture nuts. It consists of an innovative three-in-one expanding nut that is easily attached using the center nut for the square attachment hole, then secured by hand with the fastener screw. The tightened screws expand the cage nuts to secure the required components. Six cage nut assemblies can be installed in the time it takes to place two capture nuts. And it can be done without tools.

    The Rittal Fastener assembly is manufactured from sheet steel with a zinc coating to ensure electrical grounding continuity throughout the structural members of racks and cabinets. Contacts are integrated for potential equalization. The cage nuts are durable and can be reused, moved and repositioned multiple times.

    The Rittal Fastener Cage Nut is compatible with 19” enclosure rails that meet EIA 310 standards. Clamping size range is from 1.2 – 4.5 mm.  They are sold in packages of 24 fastener cage nuts assemblies.

    For more information about 1RU cage nut assembly (PN 2090000) or to find a local distributor, visit www.rittalenclosures.com.

     

    About Rittal

    Rittal North America, headquartered in Schaumburg, Illinois, is the U.S. subsidiary of Rittal GmbH & Co. KG and manufactures the world’s leading industrial and IT enclosures, racks and accessories, including climate control and power management systems for industrial, data center, outdoor and hybrid applications. Rittal‘s off-the-shelf standard, modified standard and custom-engineered products are recognized throughout the world as innovative, high quality solutions for practically any industrial or IT infrastructure application — from single enclosures to comprehensive, mission critical systems. Learn more at www.rittalenclosures.com.

     

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    Rittal Named One of the 2016 Best Places to Work in Illinois

    Schaumburg, IL – May 10, 2016 – Rittal North America (www.rittalenclosures.com), the world’s largest enclosure manufacturer and a leader in thermal management of electrical, electronic and IT equipment, was recently named as one of the 2016 Best Places to Work in Illinois.

    “We are proud of the industrial and operational expertise that is the heart of the Rittal organization,” said Gregg Holst, President of Rittal North America. “We recognize the importance of having a workplace culture that fosters professional development, encourages excellence and value employee contributions. We are honored to be recognized with this accolade.”

    The awards program began in 2006 and is promoted by The Daily Herald Business Ledger in partnership with the Human Resources Management Association of Chicago (HRMAC), the Illinois Chamber of Commerce, MRA-The Management Association, the Small Business Advocacy Council, the Greater Oak Brook Chamber of Commerce and Best Companies Group.

    This statewide survey and awards program was designed to identify, recognize and honor the best places of employment in Illinois, benefiting the state’s economy, workforce and businesses. Rittal will be recognized and honored at the Best Places to Work in Illinois awards ceremony coordinated by The Daily Herald Business Ledger in May.

    “Rittal is deeply connected to the businesses, universities and communities of Illinois,” said Cindy Janssen, Vice President of Human Resource, Rittal North America. “This award honors those relationships.”

    Rittal North America was founded in Springfield, Ohio in 1982. Its parent company, Rittal, was started in Germany in 1961 and has grown to include offices in more than 70 countries and manufacturing facilities on 4 continents. Rittal North America’s U.S. Headquarters, located in suburban Chicago, Illinois, is a state-of-the-art facility that serves as a customer training center, including expanded teaching resources, product testing facilities and a large-scale product showroom where customers can have a hands-on experience with the entire Rittal System.
    About Rittal

    Rittal North America, headquartered in Schaumburg, Illinois, is the U.S. subsidiary of Rittal GmbH & Co. KG and manufactures the world’s leading industrial and IT enclosures, racks and accessories, including climate control and power management systems for industrial, data center, outdoor and hybrid applications. Rittal‘s off-the-shelf standard, modified standard and custom-engineered products are recognized throughout the world as innovative, high quality solutions for practically any industrial or IT infrastructure application — from single enclosures to comprehensive, mission critical systems. Learn more at www.rittalenclosures.com.

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    Rittal Hosts President Barack Obama at Germany’s Hannover Fair Industrial Trade Show

    In Photo: German Chancellor Angela Merkel Rittal Chief Executive Officer and Owner Dr. Friedhelm Loh Barack Obama, President of the United States of America Gregg Holst, President of Rittal North America

    In Photo:
    German Chancellor Angela Merkel
    Rittal Chief Executive Officer and Owner Dr. Friedhelm Loh Barack Obama, President of the United States of America Gregg Holst, President of Rittal North America

     

    Schaumburg, IL – April 25, 2016 – Rittal North America (www.rittalenclosures.com), the world’s largest enclosure manufacturer and a leader in thermal management of electrical, electronic and IT equipment, today hosted President Barack Obama in its booth at the Hannover Fair trade show.  The Rittal booth will focus on the theme of “Integrated Industry – Discover Solutions” and will feature products and solutions that deliver on the promise of Industry 4.0.

    Hannover Fair is the largest industrial trade show in the world, with more than 5000 exhibitors and 250,000 attendees from more than 70 countries. President Obama, accompanied by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, toured the booth with Rittal Chief Executive Officer and Owner Dr. Friedhelm Loh. This marks the first time a sitting U.S. President has attended the event.

    “We were honored to host the President and have the opportunity to showcase our newest technology to him,” said Gregg Holst, President of Rittal North America. “Technology innovation certainly is important to America’s ability to remain at the forefront of global manufacturing capabilities.  We were excited to share our story with him about how Rittal products make a real contribution to American manufacturing’s competitive advantage.”

    Company executives at the show were able to highlight to the President a variety of new products being featured at Hannover Fair, including the company’s new Blue e+ air conditioning units, capable of up to 75 percent energy savings compared to traditional AC units for enclosure climate control.  Also featured during the President’s tour were Rittal’s flagship TS 8 Modular Enclosure, with more than 10 million units in operation around the world.

    About Rittal

    Rittal North America, headquartered in Schaumburg, Illinois, is the U.S. subsidiary of Rittal GmbH & Co. KG and manufactures the world’s leading industrial and IT enclosures, racks and accessories, including climate control and power management systems for industrial, data center, outdoor and hybrid applications. Rittal‘s off-the-shelf standard, modified standard and custom-engineered products are recognized throughout the world as innovative, high quality solutions for practically any industrial or IT infrastructure application — from single enclosures to comprehensive, mission critical systems. Learn more at www.rittalenclosures.com.

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